google978c4e921fe1bd28.html

Shame of Kenyan police officers forced to convert cells into living quarters

The state of housing at Karatina police station in Mathira, Nyeri. Thousands of police officers who risk their lives to protect Kenyans and their property are living and working in deplorable condition

The state of housing at Karatina police station in Mathira, Nyeri. Thousands of police officers who risk their lives to protect Kenyans and their property are living and working in deplorable condition

The state of housing at Karatina police station in Mathira, Nyeri. Thousands of police officers who risk their lives to protect Kenyans and their property are living and working in deplorable conditions.

Thousands of police officers who risk their lives to protect Kenyans and their property are living and working in deplorable conditions.

A survey across the country reveals that some police officers have converted police cells into living quarters, while in some regions, the law enforcers are forced to mould mud and repair their ramshackle living quarters every time it rains.

The situation is captured by the plight of officers working at Kamwenje Police post along the Laikipia-Baringo border who have to go without basic commodities such as water, houses or even toilets.

Officers normally spend their nights in the cells which they have now converted into sleeping quarters.

The police post, put up with funding from Laikipia West Constituency Development Fund (CDF) kitty, was meant to accommodate officers who normally patrol the border.

But there were no police houses hence forcing the officers to convert the police cells into sleeping quarters.

STRONG WINDS

Thanks to attacks by cattle rustlers, all the window panes on the building have been destroued, forcing the officers to use cartons to protect themselves from strong winds.

An officer who sought anonymity, said they are forced to go to the bushes to relieve themselves.

“The state of the toilets is very bad that one cannot even visit them. We use the nearby bushes as our toilets as well as bathrooms,” he says.

The police post has no water supply.

“The closest river is over 10km from the police post and we normally ask for water from some good neighbours whom we have created rapport with. Working here is hectic,” he said.

Over 20 police officers have been deployed to the post to patrol the border and hence cannot fit in the cells.

At Kakamega Central Police Station, police officers play cat and mouse with Kenya Power over non payment of bills which normally range between Sh200,000 and Sh600,000.

“Our seniors are not enthusiastic to have the power paid in time and will not do a thorough follow up with the police headquarters to have us reconnected. You walk from your house with crumpled clothes which have not been ironed,” said a junior officer.

The officer said it was frustrating for junior officers’ children, “Peeping through the windows of the senior officers houses to watch popular TV programmes.”

And the situation is no different in Busia, with Budalang’i Administration Police headquarters having no electricity meter of its own.

“The station has tapped power from the Assistant County Commissioners office,” said a source.

Other AP camps in Mudindi, Mau Mau, Sisenye and Nambengeta have no electricity.

The state of housing at Karatina police station in Mathira, Nyeri. Thousands of police officers who risk their lives to protect Kenyans and their property are living and working in deplorable conditions.

Thousands of police officers who risk their lives to protect Kenyans and their property are living and working in deplorable conditions.

A survey across the country reveals that some police officers have converted police cells into living quarters, while in some regions, the law enforcers are forced to mould mud and repair their ramshackle living quarters every time it rains.

The situation is captured by the plight of officers working at Kamwenje Police post along the Laikipia-Baringo border who have to go without basic commodities such as water, houses or even toilets.

Officers normally spend their nights in the cells which they have now converted into sleeping quarters.

The police post, put up with funding from Laikipia West Constituency Development Fund (CDF) kitty, was meant to accommodate officers who normally patrol the border.

But there were no police houses hence forcing the officers to convert the police cells into sleeping quarters.

 STRONG WINDS

Thanks to attacks by cattle rustlers, all the window panes on the building have been destroued, forcing the officers to use cartons to protect themselves from strong winds.

An officer who sought anonymity, said they are forced to go to the bushes to relieve themselves.

“The state of the toilets is very bad that one cannot even visit them. We use the nearby bushes as our toilets as well as bathrooms,” he says.

The police post has no water supply.

“The closest river is over 10km from the police post and we normally ask for water from some good neighbours whom we have created rapport with. Working here is hectic,” he said.

Over 20 police officers have been deployed to the post to patrol the border and hence cannot fit in the cells.

At Kakamega Central Police Station, police officers play cat and mouse with Kenya Power over non payment of bills which normally range between Sh200,000 and Sh600,000.

“Our seniors are not enthusiastic to have the power paid in time and will not do a thorough follow up with the police headquarters to have us reconnected. You walk from your house with crumpled clothes which have not been ironed,” said a junior officer.

The officer said it was frustrating for junior officers’ children, “Peeping through the windows of the senior officers houses to watch popular TV programmes.”

And the situation is no different in Busia, with Budalang’i Administration Police headquarters having no electricity meter of its own.

“The station has tapped power from the Assistant County Commissioners office,” said a source.

Other AP camps in Mudindi, Mau Mau, Sisenye and Nambengeta have no electricity.

**************************

Police in Central Kenya live in deplorable conditions

Police houses. These are houses occupied by administration police officers in Kangema and which they claim expose them to cold and hot temperatures. Police officers in Central Kenya are living in deplorable conditions as they continue to protect and serve Kenyans.

Police houses. These are houses occupied by administration police officers in Kangema and which they claim expose them to cold and hot temperatures. Police officers in Central Kenya are living in deplorable conditions as they continue to protect and serve Kenyans.

Police officers in Central Kenya are living in deplorable conditions as they continue to protect and serve Kenyans.

The state of police houses in Nyeri County, for example, is a crying shame, with officers struggling to offer their services.

In Muthuthini, Mukurwe-Ini Constituency, the situation is a source of disappointment for the officers at the facility.

POLICE POST

Locals had called for a police post to be located close to a hospital after several break-ins at the health facility.

After a small fund-raiser, the station was built with simple planks of wood but after officers were posted there, no support to improve the structures has been forthcoming.

One of the officers said the wooden structures were destroyed by termites several years ago and the officers have used iron sheets to put up a roof over their heads.

“When it rains, the bedding are soaked, we all live together; young and old,” he noted.

Unfortunately, none of them have brought their families to the post because of the living conditions.

“How can I bring my wife who has two small children here? There is no privacy, and there is no space, with the walls falling apart and the wind making us fall sick,” he explained.

Some officers still live in wooden houses with leaking roofs that are partitioned by curtains and the walls are rotting.

During the cold season, the officers stuff the cracks between the wooden planks with newspapers to keep the chilling winds at bay.

At Karatina Police Station, an officer said when it rains, he wakes up to find utensils floating around his one-roomed iron-sheet house.

The officer said it was even better to spend the night out patrolling the streets than to go to the room he calls home.

“I usually try to avoid sleeping here because it is so uncomfortable, it is more of a store for my personal belongings,” he said.

At Marua Police Station, officers also live in wooden structures that have no basic amenities.

“Water is a problem as well as electricity, but we have no option but to brave the elements,” one officer complained.

In Murang’a, police officers have been neglected despite State’s assurance that they will have decent accommodation.

WORST HIT

Those working in remote areas are the worst hit as they live in deplorable conditions, while some live with their families.

At the Kangema AP camp, security officers living in galvanised-iron-sheet houses said they were exposed to harsh conditions.

An officer who spoke on condition of anonymity recounted how he suffered when he transferred to the station as a result of the new conditions of living.

He said during the day, the house is too hot while in the evening, temperatures are too low and risky for those suffering from pneumonia.

 

 

-www.standardmedia.co.ke

Comments

comments

%d bloggers like this: