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Nakuru slum group releases debut hip hop album [VIDEO]

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Members of the Eazy Life City Crew from left Steve Wanjemah, Waitegi Arafa and Brian Okoth during one of their rehearsals in Nakuru

Members of the Eazy Life City Crew from left Steve Wanjemah, Waitegi Arafa and Brian Okoth during one of their rehearsals in Nakuru

A Nakuru musical group, Eazy Life Group, has released its debut album. The group, comprising Arafa Nyambura, Kennedy Mwangi, Steve Wanjema, Roy Atale and Brian Okoth, dwell on satirising their lives in poor Nakuru neighbourhoods in their hip hop album.

The album, titled Achievement, focuses on giving hope to the people living in slums. The album has 10 songs.

The group was formed three years ago, and at first performed for free at local events, where they earned their name ‘Eazy Life’ due to their availability. They only earned a stipend bust fare back to their various slums.

Their latest video, Am Gone, shot at various locations within Nakuru’s Central Business District and at the 90km world famous Menengai crater, has been noticed by TV presenters, who have been playing the song due to its lavish scenery and the dance moves.

BARE NECESSITIES

The songs talk about moving to the best side of town and urge slum youth to trust God regardless of their current status.

The group has used the hip hop genre to not only send a message to slum dwellers but also to transform the lives of school going children.

Eazy Life surprised themselves recently when their plea to fans to raise funds to buy uniforms for a few poor children succeed. They distributed the uniforms to various children in primary and secondary schools. Band member Okoth said they chose the uniform project in solidarity with the many bright pupils who missed class due to their tattered school uniform.

“The teachers, oblivious of the suffering at home, send away such children, who remain home for log periods,” he says. “Some even drop out of school.”

“Most parents in the slums do not pay much attention to the kind of uniforms their children wear to school. Some pupils are usually sent out of class because of wearing torn school uniforms,” recalls Okoth.

He says most parents in slums value education but were unable to provide the basic necessities like food.

“Some miss school because they do not have food. We took up the challenge to address some few cases we knew but ended helping many more,” he says.

-www.nation.co.ke

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