google978c4e921fe1bd28.html

Kenyan woman’s childhood dream comes true as she heads top school

has won. She always dreamt of becoming a head teacher.

Mrs Cecilia Mutai, the Motigo Primary School headmistress shows some of the trophies her school has won. She always dreamt of becoming a head teacher.

It is a cool Monday and everything is relatively calm although one can feel a certain excitement in the air.

It is break time at Motigo Primary School in Bomet District.

The school is preparing to host the zonal trophy presentation ceremony after attaining a mean score of 301 marks in the Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) exam.

Although teachers are also taking a break, once in a while nursery school children are seen running towards the headmistress, who seems quite happy to play with them.

CHILDHOOD DREAM

Although Mrs Cecilia Mutai’s journey to her position as the head of a school was once a childhood dream, she is happy with her treacherous journey which has borne her fruits.

“It was always my dream to have so many bright children under my guidance.

And although girls were rarely educated during our days, I had even a bigger dream of having many girls whom I could use as weapons of shaping the society,” she says during the interview.

While her journey to fulfilling her dream was not easy, the 48 year old school head attributes her education success to her late uncle who took her in as a baby sitter when her parents could not raise school fees.

“During those days very few girls would go to school and at one time my aunt who was in college came for me so that I could take care of my young cousin,”

To her, that was the turning point in her life and a step to a thousand miles ahead.

“It seemed like a cleverly hatched idea of getting me out of the village where I would eventually have dropped out of school for lack of fees just like other girls,” she says.

During those days, the education system, she says, contributed to her success given that she could baby-sit her cousin in the morning and attend afternoon classes when her aunt was at home.

AFTERNOON CLASSES
“The education system favoured everyone who wished to study especially in Kajiado where we lived.

Afternoon classes had the majority of the pupils since most of us attended to our chores during the morning hours,” She says.

Although she joined school at the age of 10, she says her desire to learn so that she could become a teacher greatly motivated her despite being ridiculed.

Efforts to please her sponsors also pushed her towards achieving higher marks which saw her joining Olkejuado High School.

Her leadership responsibilities while in school helped to shape her to become a future leader, she says.

While in high school, she served as a prefect, deputy head girl and eventually the head girl.

When she finally enrolled in a college where her aunt was, Cecilia says she saw her childhood dreams coming true.

She eventually became a teacher.

Her determination and hard work saw her attain the dream of becoming a head teacher.

Currently, Mrs Mutai is heading a school with over 400 pupils.

She has held this position for the past 15 years.

EDUCATING GIRL CHILD

During her first four years, she says, she worked with the local community teaching them on the importance of educating the girl child and encouraging young girls to take their studies seriously.

One of the main issues that she addresses is early marriages among school girls.

She says it is a role of both the community and teachers to teach the girl child on the importance of maintaining their dignity for them to achieve the best results from education.

“Early pregnancies have significantly dropped and our school has greatly improved coming to in our zone.

It is also among the best performing schools in the county,” she says.

She says she keeps track of her pupils and prides herself with the fact that many of them are in higher institutions of learning.

-Nation

Comments

comments

Tags: , ,
%d bloggers like this: