google978c4e921fe1bd28.html

Fresh enrolments from EA in American varsities drop as Kenya’s numbers decline

Fresh enrolment of students from Tanzania rose to 950 in the last academic year that began in last year’s fall semester compared to 906 who were enrolled in the previous year’s fall semester. A total of 783 students from Uganda were enrolled up from 779 over the same period of time. Fresh enrolments from Rwanda stood at 565 students up from 465 while those from Burundi rose to 124 from 103.

Fresh enrolment of students from Tanzania rose to 950 in the last academic year that began in last year’s fall semester compared to 906 who were enrolled in the previous year’s fall semester. A total of 783 students from Uganda were enrolled up from 779 over the same period of time. Fresh enrolments from Rwanda stood at 565 students up from 465 while those from Burundi rose to 124 from 103.

IN SUMMARY

  • Fresh enrolments by students originating from Kenya fell by 9.8 per cent to 3,516 in the academic year that started in August 2012
  • In the academic year that started in August 2011, the number of fresh enrolments of Kenyan students in American universities stood at 3,898
  • Fresh enrolment of students from Tanzania rose to 950 in the last academic year that began in last year’s fall semester compared to 906 who were enrolled in the previous year’s fall semester
  • 783 students from Uganda were enrolled up from 779
  • A total of 565 students from Rwanda enrolled in universities in USA up from 465 while those from Burundi rose to 124 from 103

The number of fresh enrollments of Kenyan students into universities in the United States of America (USA) dropped again in the last academic year while those of the other four East African countries increased slightly, according to fresh data released by the Institute of International Education (IIE).

The institute, which tracks the number fresh international student enrollments and the number of United States students studying in other countries around the world, has said that fresh enrollments by students originating from Kenya fell by a further 9.8 per cent to 3,516 in the academic year that started in August 2012.

In the academic year that started in August 2011, the number of fresh enrollments of Kenyan students in American universities stood at 3,898.

The drop in the number of students from Kenya resulted in an overall decline in the total number of enrollments from the five East African countries.

Fresh enrollment of students from Tanzania rose to 950 in the last academic year that began in last year’s fall semester compared to 906 who were enrolled in the previous year’s fall semester while 783 students from Uganda were enrolled up from 779 over the same period of time.

A total of 565 students from Rwanda enrolled in universities in USA up from 465 while those from Burundi rose to 124 from 103 (See graphic below).

studentsimage

Allan Goodman, president of IIE said that one of the benefits of international education is that it helps to understand cultural differences and historical experiences giving individuals a global perspective.

“International students coming to study in the US benefit from access to some of the finest professors and research laboratories in the world and Americans benefit substantially from the presence of international students who bring their own unique perspectives and knowledge to the classroom and the wider community,” said Dr Goodman in a statement.

The number of international students at colleges and universities in the United States increased by 7 per cent to a high of 819,644 students with most of the growth driven by China and Saudi Arabia.

The total number of new enrollments from the five East African countries stood at 5,938 for the academic year that began in August 2012 which was a marginal 3.46 per cent decline from the previous year’s 6,151 new enrollments (See graphic Above).

“International education promotes the relationship building and knowledge exchange between people and communities in the United States and around the world that are necessary to solve global challenges,” said Evan Ryan, assistant secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs.

Research from the National Association of Foreign Student Advisers (NAFSA), shows that nearly 313,000 jobs are supported or generated as a result of international student spending on tuition and living expenses while in the United States.

The organization, which is also known as the Association of International Educators, said that for every 7 international students enrolled, 3 jobs are created or supported in the United States by spending occurring in the higher education, accommodation, dining, retail, transportation, telecommunications and health insurance sectors.

NAFSA data shows that the net contribution by foreign students and their families to the United States economy totaled $23.954 billion in the last academic year.

While enrollments from Kenya continued trending down, Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda and Tanzania enrollments increased.

The continued drop in the number of new enrollments by students from Kenya started in the fall semester that started in August 2003 when 7,381 fresh students from Kenya got into American universities down from a peak of 7,862 who enrolled in the fall semester of August 2002 (See graphic Above).

Despite the continued drop, Kenya still came second to Nigeria in Africa which had 7,316 students enrolled in the last academic year up from 7,028 students enrolled in the August 2011 academic year.

 

-The EastAfrican

Comments

comments

%d bloggers like this: